Tag Archives: light pollution

Astrophotography with a Fisheye, take two… and Observation of the Summer Triangle

Folks, I will post an entry re my time at Stellafane, I promise. However, the editor of our astronomical club newsletter forced me at gunpoint (really, he did! Really!) to write an article for the newsletter, so I will share something after that is published.

One thing that happened when I went there is that I tried to do astrophotography using a fisheye lens but screwed up with using too low an ISO (a measure of film sensitivity, leading to photos that were too dark (you’ll see them later.

After the debacle that was my failed attempt at astrophotography at Stellafane, I decided to try again.

This time, I originally planned to go to StarFest 2014 at Hopewell Furnace tonight, which is another amateur astronomy conference. However, I managed to get a light fever, and did not feel like going everybody else sick instead. I decided to do astrophotography work at home, and to also break out my telescope. There was not much that I could see in my sky, because there’s so much light pollution in Havertown, and the summer haze makes it worse. However, I was able to see the Big Dipper, four stars of the Little Dipper, and various other stars. I’d rate the transparency at a 4 and the seeing around 6. For here, It was a good night. I did manage to see Cygnus and the Summer Triangle, which was unusual for this time of year.

So, these are some pictures of my slightly better attempt at stack astrophotography. In the last two final photos, there are some slight diagonal lines. That’s due to the fact that I’m trying out a demo of Nebulosity 3–it’s a Mac program that does photo stacking. I was using my Canon 60D using my Rokinon 8mm Fisheye, set at infinity with an ISO of 1250 for a 10 sec exposure after a 10 second delay. I didn’t use bias or flat images, just dark images.

Notes about the individual photos are below.

First step of stacking is taking pics with the lens caps on to help the stacking program (Nebulosity 3) figure out what sensor errors are present.
First step of stacking is taking pics with the lens caps on to help the stacking program (Nebulosity 3) figure out what sensor errors are present.
Since so many pictures are very dark when I do this, it helps to use my red flashlight to mark the beginning of sets.
Since so many pictures are very dark when I do this, it helps to use my red flashlight to mark the beginning of sets.
This is the sky taken without stacking. Unfortunately, all of the ambient light against the dark led to many pictures of the lens' apeture being open (the reddish spots). I hate light pollution.
This is the sky taken without stacking. Unfortunately, all of the ambient light against the dark led to many pictures of the lens’ apeture being open (the reddish spots). I hate light pollution.
The final stacked image. I used high contrast, lower exposure, more blue, increased clarity, and vignetting in Adobe Lightroom to cut down on the light pollution effect.
The final stacked image. I used high contrast, lower exposure, more blue, increased clarity, and vignetting in Adobe Lightroom to cut down on the light pollution effect.
Some of the things that were visible. Of course, the Northern Cross was visible as well, but I didn't want to confuse the Summer Triangle picture with it, which overlaps.
Some of the things that were visible. Of course, the Northern Cross was visible as well, but I didn’t want to confuse the Summer Triangle picture with it, which overlaps.
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14-4-9 9:16PM OBSERVATION (MARS) [OBS #4]; and a serious rant.

So, last night’s observation was of our planetary neighbor, Mars.

What is it with Mars, though?  It seems to bring out all the crazies.

First off, we have this musical masterpiece:

WAR OF THE WORLDS: The Disco Version

Then, we finally have figured out what THEY have planned for the Red Planet:

The Illuminati Discusses their Plans for Mars (not quite so coherently)

And last, but not least, Pastor John Hagee shows his adeptness at astronomy (wait, that’s astrology, actually.  Isn’t that something guys like he don’t….oh, never mind.).

The ‘Blood Moons’ heralds the Apocalypse?

So, this is what Mars is, anyway, despite all the speculation and fluff:

Mars, captured through Nikon Aculon 10×50 binos with my iPhone 5s. Edited in Lightroom 5.4

This is my more formal observation of it.  Sad to say, I did not see any little green men.

14-04-09 Observation--Mars (3 of 4)
Observation form for 14-4-9 (Mars)

And here is what my iPhone app, Star Walk, had to say.

14-04-09 Observation--Mars (4 of 4)
Mars at 9:16 on 14-4-9 as seen through Star Walk, an iPhone app.

So, what kind of things are on Mars?  Can’t see much from my picture.  But, here are some things about the Red Planet:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars

Aside from the cultural history of Mars, it is noteworthy that it wouldn’t be a particularly fun place to stay.  Too cold, covered in rust, and only a tiny bit of yucky tasting acidic water.  Yes, if I were a Martian, I would want to invade the Earth.  Earth girls are cuter.

Now, on to my rant. 

See all those stars in the Star Walk picture?  See all the stars in the picture of Mars that I took?  What?  No stars in the picture I took?  Just Mars, right?

Folks, I did this observation in my company’s parking lot, which is flooded with light.  That night I could see Mars, Spica (lower right hand star in the “box” in Virgo), and Jupiter.  That’s about it.

That’s light pollution for you.

Seriously, it is a real problem.  I’ve heard of complaints from city folks when they went out to the country and thought people were poisoning the air because they saw a “cloud” that extended for the length of the sky (er, that’s the Milky Way, city mouse).

Wikipedia pic of the Milky Way in the Black rock Desert of Nevada.

The first time I really SAW the Milky Way was when I was bowhunting in Sullivan County, PA (Northern Tier).  I was camping in my car and was awakened at 3AM by a bright light.  I opened my eyes and looked outside to see loads of stars, very much like the picture above.  I marveled in wonder and felt sad that where I live, one is not able to see such sights.

I live in a “white zone,” an area classified as the highest level of light pollution available.  Where I live, I can see the larger, brighter constellations.  That’s about it without a telescope.  In the following link, which includes my town, Havertown, you can see how white it is.

Havertown, PA light pollution 4/12/14
Havertown, PA light pollution 4/12/14

Compare that with Cherry Springs State Park, near Coudersport, PA, an International Dark Site (one of the darker places in the country).  That’s in blue, which means it is better.  I suspect the grey area below is either not measured, or even better, but not easily accessible.

Cherry Springs State Park Light Pollution 4/12/14
Cherry Springs State Park Light Pollution 4/12/14

The website where you can go to look and see what light pollution is like near you is at http://www.jshine.net/astronomy/dark_sky/.  You can also check out http://www.blue-marble.de/nightlights/2012.  I’m definitely moving to South Australia.  The USA is too depressing.

Light pollution is  a serious problem.  Check out this PBS documentary on the issue:

PBS Light Pollution

How good/bad is your area?  Use the Bortle Dark Sky Scale.  My area is pretty bad, around a 7-8 on the scale.  Hope yours is better.  If it is, invite me out!